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Life in Canada

Americans as Non-Immigrants - Bruce Bolin

Time 0:00:47

Transcript:

Otherwise I think everything was at least as good in Canada. For me I was almost like a non-immigrant in many respects. As a child I visited Canada so I knew it was right across the border. Even when my grandmother gave me the money to buy a car, I shopped around and found the best price was in Windsor. So we bought my car in Windsor rather than Detroit because of the exchange and such it was a better price. It was a British car so that had something to do with it. Canada was foreign but not that foreign to me. I knew the culture was similar, I knew across the border people wouldn’t necessarily realize I was American unless I told them (laughs).

Oral History 16.03.03BB with Bruce Bolin
Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

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Immigrant vs Belonging - Tom Corcoran

Time 0:00:51

Transcript:

Emily Burton (EB): So do you see yourself as an immigrant?

Tom Corcoran (TC): I see myself as belonging here as opposed to there. I don’t know what that means. Do I see myself as an immigrant? No. I never felt like an immigrant.

EB: Now why do you think that is?

TC: Because it was so comfortable to be here, so easy to be here, I don’t know. I certainly don’t have to, you know—I work at the college here now, and I watch the college try to help immigrants become part of this society and it’s a real chore: language barriers and all sorts of colour barriers, everything. I had none of those. I spoke the same language in a funny way (laughs) to some people but I had none of those issues.

Oral History 14.05.07TC with Tom Corcoran
Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21


Back to the Land - Peter Seixas

Time 0:02:13

Transcript:

Powell River, the town, was a mill town, um, and the mill at that time was run by MacMillan Bloedel, and other than these eighty acres, all of the land surrounding, was either owned by MacMillan Bloedel, or was provincial tree farm licence. So, this was sort of a unique piece of land. The town—and—we—in going there, and doing this, we thought in some ways we were providing—we were not only doing this ourselves, we were providing a model of how life should be lived. I mean, we saw—in—some ways this—this is still right. There’s a—there’s a thread of me that still sees this as a, as a believable response to the conditions that we face today. I mean, we saw the, uh, problems—global warming wasn’t on the horizon, but environmental problems certainly were. The alienation of the social organization, domination of corporations, and so on, and this was a way to step outside it. Of course, we stepped outside it knowing nothing about how to do it. Um, none of us—I hadn’t done any work, even in a garden, much less a farm. I had done no carpentry work. A few people who were there had little bits and pieces of skills, but no one was an expert, and I had never done anything with an animal, other than feed a—a dog. (laughs) So having goats and chickens and, milking them and killing the chickens, uh, for—for meat, these were all—every piece of this was a new skill that we needed to learn.

Oral History 14.02.27PS with Peter Seixas
Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

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Reactions to a War Resister - Christopher Rigg

Time 0:00:30

Transcript:

We had a lot of support in Canada. We also had people—when I run into people—I've never been discriminated against in terms of jobs or public service, but I've certainly run into people who did not approve of my leaving the United States for that reason and, in particular, did not approve of my leaving the army. They're entitled to their opinion.

Oral History 05.02.19CR with Christopher Rigg
Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21


These audio clips are available in English. Transcripts for each clip are available in French and have been translated from English.