Exhibitions at Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

Woman looking at portrait of Bhangra dancers
Past temporary exhibition Shaping Canada: Exploring Our Cultural Landscapes

Discover the Museum’s main exhibition dedicated to the years when Pier 21 was open as an immigration shed. Learn about the one million immigrants, refugees, war brides, evacuee children and displaced persons who came through this gateway between 1928 and 1971. You’ll also learn about Canada’s participation during the desperate days of the Second World War when 500,000 military personnel departed from Pier 21. Hear the personal stories of diverse immigrants from all over the world in our 20 minute contemporary bilingual film in Canada (shown at regular times throughout the day).

Wheel of Conscience

JOINT STATEMENT
Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs and the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

The Honourable Jason Kenny, Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, and Daniel Libeskind, architect, unveil the Wheel of Conscience on January 20, 2011.
The Honourable Jason Kenny, Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, and Daniel Libeskind, architect, unveil the Wheel of Conscience on January 20, 2011. ©SteveKaiserPhotography.ca

November 14, 2014

Presently, the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 is closed for significant renovations as it undergoes a six-month period of extensive construction in anticipation of its reopening in May 2015.

Due to this significant construction period and ensuing unsafe environment, Soheil Mosun Limited of Toronto, Ontario, has generously assisted the Museum by providing a safe and secure storage facility for the Wheel of Conscience.

The Wheel of Conscience was developed by the Canadian Jewish Congress to memorialize the story of the St. Louis and was funded by the Community Historical Recognition Program. The monument, designed by architect, Daniel Libeskind, is a motorized, one-of-a-kind art piece, requiring specialized support which only few technicians can tend to.

In his artist statement, Libeskind describes the wheel as driven by gears which are symbolic of both the gears of a ship and the “gears” of government. The words hatred, racism and xenophobia are represented on three gears smallest to largest. These gears combined, move the largest and most prominent gear of anti-Semitism. The rotating gears fracture and reassemble the image of the ship at set intervals. The gears represent the vicious circle that brought tragedy to so many lives and dishonour to Canada.

During this time and given the specific needs of the monument, the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs (CIJA) is working to identify the most appropriate home for the monument, with the assistance of the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21.

“We are impressed by the commitment both the Museum and the Government has demonstrated to ensure the Wheel of Conscience is fully operational and available to be seen by as many Canadians as possible for years to come,” Shimon Fogel, CEO, Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs.